Photoblog

Flowers all over08.07.2019
That's right - there are flowers all over the garden. Did you know that one of our three specializations are plant blooming in summer? So that you can enjoy another storm of colours and flowers shapes once the spring bulbs and shrubs have finished. We have flowers for the whole summer and also autumn!

Late June and early July is always the time for tulip trees. This one is rather narrow and columnar - Fastigiatum. Its flowers do look like tulips and also have a faint fragrance.
Flowers all over08.07.2019
Veronicas are great perennials whose various species and varieties bloom in spring or summer. Eveline starts in mid June and contunues for about 6 weeks.
Flowers all over08.07.2019
Ulster Blue Dwarf is deep blue and dwarf.
Flowers all over08.07.2019
Also dwarf is Bubblegum Candy.
Flowers all over08.07.2019
Deeper pink, taller yet very compact and incredibly free flowering until autumn is my favourite First Love®.
Flowers all over08.07.2019
Bottle Rocket leopard plant loves moist or even wet soil and does well also in partial shade.
Flowers all over08.07.2019
And closely related ligularia przewalski likes the same conditions but is much taller.
Flowers all over08.07.2019
And obviously we cannot miss lavenders. This one is called Essence Purple.
Flowers all over08.07.2019
Flowers all over08.07.2019
Talking of lavenders, I often hear people say 'I would like something blue/purple in my garden, for example lavenders ...'. If you don't mind me saying lavenders are violet, not purple or blue. If you want a blue flower look at this Porcelain Blue corydalis, this one is blue.
Flowers all over08.07.2019
And finally, to give you something to look forward to, I have a picture if these gorgeous Cherokee Sunset rudbeckias. They will be available very soon. When? Perhaps in a week, or maybe in a couple days, blimey, and what if tonight?? :-)
Flowers all over08.07.2019
And if you have never been to our garden centre here are a few pictures showing the beautiful flowers we sell :-)
Flowers all over08.07.2019
We go to extremes when it comes to care of our perennials. We spend a lot of time making them as healthy, bushy, and beautiful, preferably in 2liter or larger pots that will secure a good root system that will guarantee the best chances to establish soon in your garden.
Flowers all over08.07.2019
Salvias are in fashion. Again? No, always! They definitely belong to the most demanded species which is why we reserved them a spot of honour at the entrance. We have every colour available - deep violet blue, violet, pink, and also white - dwarf and medium tall.
Flowers all over08.07.2019
At this time of summer there are plenty of achilleas and coneflowers begin to open their multicoloured heads. What a show!
Flowers all over08.07.2019
Blanket flowers, gauras, phlox etc. etc. Have I forgot something? Definitely, so you'd better come to see for yourself, we are looking forwrd to seeing you here :-)
Flowers all over08.07.2019
Blanket flowers
Flowers all over08.07.2019
Hardy fuchsias
Flowers all over08.07.2019
So see you soon!
Catalpas and chitalpas are blooming04.07.2019
Late June and early July is always the time for flowering catalpas and chitalpas. If I knew dendrology as a young boy as I do now I would most certainly connect their image to the school certificate at the end of a term.
Catalpas and chitalpas are blooming04.07.2019
Catalpa is called Indian bean tree because it comes from North America which is why it withstands harsh frost, and late in the season it makes long seed pods similar to those that hold beans.
Catalpas and chitalpas are blooming04.07.2019
The flowers are beautiful. They are composed in large, erect racemes. Their main colour white and each variety has a slightly different colour in the throat. This is the species.
Catalpas and chitalpas are blooming04.07.2019
Purpurea variety has deep burgundy red new leaves and the flowers have more prominent red veins.
Catalpas and chitalpas are blooming04.07.2019
Aurea bears lime green foliage and the flowers are only a little lighter in colour.
Catalpas and chitalpas are blooming04.07.2019
And it's also the foliage why we want catalpas in our gardens. The leaves are very large, heart-shaped, and offer three colours. The species produces medium green leaves and vertically oval canopy.
Catalpas and chitalpas are blooming04.07.2019
Aurea variety has bright lime green to chartreuse leaves and wide, dome-shaped canopy.
Catalpas and chitalpas are blooming04.07.2019
New leaves of Purpurea are deep burgundy red.
Catalpas and chitalpas are blooming04.07.2019
Their size is enormous.
Catalpas and chitalpas are blooming04.07.2019
Chitalpa is an interspecific cross between chilopsis and catalpa. It boasts beautiful, light pink flowers and exotic, narrow leaves.
Catalpas and chitalpas are blooming04.07.2019
It blooms profusely from late June until late August.
Catalpas and chitalpas are blooming04.07.2019
Flowers and leaves are not the only features catalpas are renowned for. Older plants, if grown as a shrub, form a massive framework of bottom branches, an ideal climbing attraction for kids :-)
Catalpas and chitalpas are blooming04.07.2019
Summer Bells® Chitalpa
Catalpas and chitalpas are blooming04.07.2019
I like the area under the canopies of multistemmed trees. Even though I struggle with space in my garden and tend to fill every gap I keep this half empty to enjoy the free space.
Works of art16.06.2019
I bet you must be wondering why I am showing a copy of a beautiful and famous painting on a horticultural website. Well, it's because it shows beauty, and plants deserve the same attention like models. Not a long time ago I got a book of the best portraits of the past two centuries for my niece who studies an art school. I chose it because it had a portrait of Madame X by John Singer Sargent on the cover, one of my most favourite. I remember someone ever said that the way Sargent paints arms is like angels singing ... and he was right.

Do you know the story of the painting? One of the most provocative at its time, it was finished in 1884 in France. The model was an American expat Madame Virginie Gautreau who married a successful banker in Paris. She kept on rejecting Sargent's proposals to sit for him as a model, and the painter - in his twenties - kept on begging her for two long years until he wore her off and she eventually agreed. Sargent, eager to make a painting of his lifetime devoted numerous hours to correcting sketches and deciding for the best position. Finally they both agreed that she would be standing up, looking left with her head looking aside, in her black iconic dress where originally the right strap dangled daringly off her shoulder. SCANDALOUS! All Paris was full of disgust and rejection of such a painting which made Sargent correct the painting moving the strap back on her shoulder. It did not help much so in the end he had to flee to America. Still, the painting is now considered not only his best but also one of the best ever portraits in history.

The beauty, charisma, and energy (nowadays we would probably say sex-appeal) was something that only a true artist could transform onto the canvas. It is not about a photographic perfection. It's the feeling you get from it. Looking at the painting you can sense it. Quite a few times several famous women tried to imitate the painting posing for a camera, including Madonna (of course!) and even Nicole Kidman. Unfortunately none of them seemed to share the same charisma and inner beauty that could be projected into the atmosphere and make you beg for it.

When I am out in the garden with my camera I look at the plants the same way. I do not look for a perfect shot detailing every petal of leaflet. I try to capture the best moment and the most appealing angle and light that would show the plant the way I see it and sense it. And believe me - many times I DO beg - for better light, less water, less shadows etc. Why bother? Because all plants are works of art and they deserve to be portrayed. Now sit back, relax, and see for yourself.
Works of art16.06.2019
Caradonna sage
Works of art16.06.2019
Brilliant poppy
Works of art16.06.2019
bearskin fescue
Works of art16.06.2019
Anthony Waterer rhododendron
Works of art16.06.2019
grape hyacinth
Works of art16.06.2019
Lavender Twist weeping redbud
Works of art16.06.2019
Koehnei dwarf red buckeye
Works of art16.06.2019
beachhead iris
Works of art16.06.2019
Innocent Glance clematis
Works of art16.06.2019
Larkspur
Works of art16.06.2019
Mango Storm flowering quince
Works of art16.06.2019
WINKY columbine
Festival of colours05.06.2019
Do you enjoy colours in the garden? Be it the flowers or coloured foliage. This Golden Sunshine willow is fantastic. Sunny or a cloudy day, it still glows like a hot sun.
Festival of colours05.06.2019
BLOOMERANG® lilac series contains varieties which bloom for the first time now and rebloom in summer without pruning or any other encouragement. This pink one is called Pink Perfume.
Festival of colours05.06.2019
Festival of colours05.06.2019
And its dark coloured variety is called simply Dark Purple.
Festival of colours05.06.2019
And the colour is deeper while the plants is still in bud.
Festival of colours05.06.2019
Goldminers, throw away your pickaxes and sell your plane ticket to Alaska. Instead get yourself as many plants of this Golden Queen globe flower and rest asured you have enough gold for at least late spring and early summer.
Festival of colours05.06.2019
This year we have two new varieties which are very similar. One of them must have been bred in England because it was named after one of the most popular cheese there - Cheddar.
Festival of colours05.06.2019
I fell in love with this beauty this year. It is a campion varitey, new in our assortment called Rollies Favourite. It was a tiny plant last year and now it makes a large clump that has been flowering for two months now!
Festival of colours05.06.2019
Festival of colours05.06.2019
Do you like blue? This ordinary Knallblau veronica is absolutely extraordinary.
Festival of colours05.06.2019
Festival of colours05.06.2019
Possibly the best selling flowering groundcover is called sandwort. It's like a cushion of fresh snow or whipped cream, yummy!
Festival of colours05.06.2019
Festival of colours05.06.2019
Geum is another of my favourite perennials. This one comes from England and is called Scarlet Tempest. Its large, scarlet orange flowers attract attention from a distance.
Festival of colours05.06.2019
Empress tree - a fragrant beauty30.05.2019
Last three weeks or so almost every other customer who got out of the car in our parking lot came closer to the tree we have at the front gate. They wanted to check what kind of beauty grows there, and makes such unusual, rich violet flowers that release a strong, sweet scent.

Its name is paulownia and is commonly found in royal gardens and arboretums. There are two species in cultivation: empress tree (in this picture) and recently also Fortune's foxglove tree (in the following picture).
Empress tree - a fragrant beauty30.05.2019
This one has slightly wider open flowers and grows a little shorter. But most importantly - it produces flowers at a very young age, often from 3 years of age.
Empress tree - a fragrant beauty30.05.2019
And when the flowers have gone its enormous leaves take over. They are huge on young plants which grow very fast (50-100 cm per year), and slow down with age when the tree begins to bloom (20-30 cm per year then). Paulownia often produces profusion of flowers every other year, not annually.
Empress tree - a fragrant beauty30.05.2019
In other words you cannot miss this one out if you have space to accommodate it :-)
Mexican orange which is not (an) orange26.05.2019
Hey, so glad to see you again! It's been some time since the last post, but you know how busy spring is for the gardeners. And since the weather forcast lied again and it is NOT the typical sunday sunshine outside, I am ready as well as eager to show you something. This is a sort of horticultural exhibitionism I guess. Beware - highly addictive, yet very pleasant and easy to get used to :-)

Today's highlight is choisya. Its common name Mexican orange refers to its very similar flowers which also have a strong, intoxicating fragrance. Nothing to do with the fruit.

Mexican orange which is not (an) orange26.05.2019
The original species choisya ternata comes from Mexico and its low hardiness did not allow us to use it here. However, in 1980's English breeder Peter Moore gained seeds of another American species choisya dumosa var. arizonica and crossbred these two. The result was astonishing - a beautiful and incredibly hardy plant with narrower, more leathery leaves. It was named AZTEC PEARL and introduced in 1989.
Mexican orange which is not (an) orange26.05.2019
I trialled it on several locations throughout the country and it proved very hardy and troublefree. It is no secret that I love evergreen plant which is why I pay so much attention to it. Moreover, this plant is unique for being possibly the first ever evergreen shrub with palmately divided foliage. So far only entire leaves were present (first and second column), exceptionally mahonia (the long compound leaf in the third column), while choisyas (in the last column (Aztec Pearl. White Dazzler, Apple Blossom, Aztec Gold) have palmate leaves.
Mexican orange which is not (an) orange26.05.2019
Moreover leaves are very tolerant to winter sunlight - not prone so sunscorch, and remain this beautiful shade of fresh green all winter long when the surrounding landscape is fast asleep.
Mexican orange which is not (an) orange26.05.2019
Another successful variety is WHITE DAZZLER which offer twice or even three times as many flowers on a more compact and upright shrubs. Its leaves are narrower, deeper green, and not as glossy.
Mexican orange which is not (an) orange26.05.2019
And as a bonus it can flower for the second time in late summer. Not much but it is nice and fragrant.
Mexican orange which is not (an) orange26.05.2019
The fragrance attracts not only but but various winged insects, mostly bees and bumble bees, butterflies and chafers.
Mexican orange which is not (an) orange26.05.2019
Just like most other braodleaved plants choisya, too, has its yellow-leaved mutation. It is called AZTEC GOLD and makes bright chartreuse to soft golden yellow leaves.
Mexican orange which is not (an) orange26.05.2019
The latest smash is a linear-leaves APPLE BLOSSOM. It looks like a green spiderweb and is the only one with pink flowers, or precisely pink buds before the flowers open. This variety produces flowers at a later age.

So have you chosen your choisya? Place it in full sun if free draining, acid soil, water it lightly the first year, and from next year no care is needed - no irrigation, no fertilizing, no pruning. Isn't is great?!

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LARGE PLANTS over 150 cmspecimens, screening and hedging shrubs

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