Photoblog

Berries of all colours14.02.2021
Autumn and winter is the time for coloured berries which please our sight and fill birds' stomach. They appear mostly on holly shrubs but there are afew other plants offering coloured fruit for our feathered friends.

Clusterberry holly is quite rare. It does not have the showiest foliage but offers perhaps the largest amount of fruit clustered along its branches.
Berries of all colours14.02.2021
On the other hand, Amber is a holly with very attractive leaves as well as unique orange fruit.
Berries of all colours14.02.2021
Pyramidalis holly also produces masses of berries.
Berries of all colours14.02.2021
Bacciflava and Bacciflava Spineless produce foliage as beautiful as Amber holly and bright yellow fruit.
Berries of all colours14.02.2021
And the lushest foliage belongs to Camelliifolia holly. It makes vibrant red fruit.
Berries of all colours14.02.2021
Camelliifolia
Berries of all colours14.02.2021
And there's another one with yellow berries - Golden Girl.
Berries of all colours14.02.2021
Laurustinus is blue like blueberries.
Berries of all colours14.02.2021
Berries from Mars. This colour is simply out of this world. Beauty berry bush.
Berries of all colours14.02.2021
Much sooner than in winter matures fruit of multiple varieties of St.John's wort.
Berries of all colours14.02.2021
Berries of all colours14.02.2021
Berries of all colours14.02.2021
Berries of all colours14.02.2021
Do you like edible fruit of Teutonia Japanese dogwood? Birds do, too. The faster wins.
Berries of all colours14.02.2021
And if you think that sea buckthorn has enough fruit when it comes to who will eat the crop, you might like to think twice.
Berries of all colours14.02.2021
On the other hand there are shrubs which literally belong to birds, just like privet. In Czech language it is called bird food. Aptly named. Bon apetit, oiseaux :-)
Alright, I was wrong, I admit it ...10.02.2021
A month later we're back with an update of the latest video where I discovered that I was wrong. I suggest you wathc it not to make the same mistake as I did, sorry, guys :-)
Do we have to clear snow off our plants?09.01.2021
Did you ever manage to break a branch or two on plants while clearing them off the snow? Well, not all plants need your help. If you want to see what I do have a look at our latest video here.
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
A friend of mine, a plant lover, too, is from India. From time to time, we exchange photos of what’s blooming right now here and there. This time he posted a few pictures with his friends in swimming trunks at a beach. It made my knowledge of geography a bit unstable, so I had to reassure myself whether it is also winter there. Of course, he said, and the fact that it is 30 °C makes no change about it. Well, good for them. Much to our displeasure, here our swimwear is of no use anywhere these days …

Still, it was clear from his photos that nothing was blooming there. Apart from a few annuals in pots. Here we had some snow over Christmas that has turned to ice during almost every-day sunlight so I was going to make a nice photo of the miniature shiny glaciers formed on the grass and between the plants. But then I noticed something much more interesting – one camellia shrub had a few flowers. Wow, that was a catch of the day. Who would have thought we could beat Indian riviera at Goa with winter blooming camellias in Central Europe! 😊

Of course I am exaggerating but isn’t it great to see some flowers outside at this time of year anyway? In any quantity? And as I have noticed you like camellias as much as I do I decided to devote my New Year’s post to them. Wishing you all the best in 2021 and lots of love!
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
I first came across these beautiful plants in England some 25 years ago when I travelled to Cornwall to see the Eden Project. Can you see me on the right side? I was such a cub then :-) I went on my own and asked a couple of vacationing retired ladies to make a picture of me and they insisted that I had to smile. Analog camera, see the quality ... Eden is a greenhouse project made out of a few domes simulating three different climates if I remember that rightly. It was new at that time, huge, spectacular, and it attracted visitors from all around Europe. Palm trees all around, strelitzias, cacti, anything you would imagine in (sub)tropics. Yes, nice. As a holiday experience. But useless for our gardens as none of those plants would grow in our frontyard.I was more attracted to plant growing outside Eden, in gardens of those beautiful Cornwall houses and mansons. Especially camellias that were literally everywhere. I swear that every other garden had at least one. I spoke about them with someone in my hotel where I stayed and with typical English arrogance they assured me that these shrubs would not grow anywhere else because only THEY had the best climate for them. Thank you, sweethearts, it really got me going! It got me so upset that I began searching for information about growing them in cold climates. And I got hold of an article about two Americans who did this back in the States after the most severe winter of 1986. They were dr. William Ackerman a dr. Clifford Parks.
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
Unfortunately American hybrids seemed unavailable in Europe then. But some time later we visited our North-Italian supplier of kalmias and azaleas. We were invited to join them for dinner upon our arrival as they were celebrating owner's jubilee the same evening, and offered accommodation in their Agriturismo right in the nursery. It was deep in the night when we went to bed, tired from the journey and the celebration so we did not look around much. We woke up to a misty morning on a hill covered with camellia shrubs. It was a stunning sight. It was late November so all of them were sasanqua types flowering in autumn and winter. Contrary to the spring types they have a big advantage of making flower buds in summer so they never loose them because of late frosts like spring varieties sometimes do. The nursery is situated just behind the Alps so they do know frost and they also grow some hardier camellias.
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
I took a few seedlings for testing but they were no success. All died within one or two years. Not sure whether the problem was the variety or the location. Anyway. Shortly after I got hold of a contact for a passionate grower of those American hybrids in the Netherlands. He had a huge range of them and I took everything he recommended for our climate and the plants worked very well. Heureka! Unfortunately he decided to stop propagating new plants and turned his place into a camellia arboretum. But he gave me tips on where we could get hold of his plants in future. The availability is still very limited but slowly growing.

Here are some pictures of camellias I made over the past couple of years. This one is camellia hiemalis. One of the longest winter flowering species. And yes - the white background is snow. The plant starts flowering in late autumn and continues during warm periods of winter.
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
camellia hiemalis
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
Winter's Star is another long flowering sasanqua type. It starts in October and continues until January. It is the same plant as in the first picture of today's photoblog.
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
Winter's Fire
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
Winter's Interlude
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
Black Lace
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
Spring Festival if one of the hardiest spring flowering camellias that can grow in full sun, too. It makes elegant, upright shrubs which is why it is very popular for evergreen hedges.
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
Its other asset is the colour of newly emerging foliage. Rich maroon, isn't it fantastic?
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
April Blush
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
April Rose
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
April Kiss
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
April Dawn / Festival
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
April Dawn / Festival
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
April Remembered
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
April Remembered
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
Hagoromo
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
Adeyaka
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
Pink Icicle
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
Pink Icicle
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
Fire And Ice
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
Shintsukasa-nishiki
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
Shintsukasa-nishiki
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
Kimberley
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
Kuro Delight
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
New Year's camellias01.01.2021
Which one will you choose? :-)

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